[could] Videos

►Read: How the most mobile eyes in the animal kingdom work
https://on.ft.com/2rjShR2

Bristol university is uncovering how the peacock mantis shrimp makes sense of images from its swivelling, stalk-like eyes – even when the world is whirling around it.

► Subscribe to FT.com here:http://bit.ly/2GakujT

► Subscribe to the Financial Times on YouTube: http://bit.ly/FTimeSubs

For more video content from the Financial Times, visit http://www.FT.com/video

Twitter https://twitter.com/ftvideo
Facebook https://www.facebook.com/financialtimes

tafbutton blue16 How shrimps could help develop robots machine vision

The giant river prawn is one of the world’s most cultivated, and most popular mealtime freshwater shrimp in the world. But evidently there’s still not quite enough …

tafbutton blue16 Transformed Male Prawns Could Increase World Food Supply

According to a research study led by McGill University in Canada, the Great Lakes-St. Lawrence River basin area will continue to be threatened by non-native species unless regulations are put in place by the U.S. and Canadian governments.

The Great Lakes and St. Lawrence River basin remain vulnerable to non-native species, including invaders such as killer shrimp.

This is a conclusion from a study led by Canada’s McGill University, which has projected the effects newly introduced aquatic life will have on the Midwestern water system over the next 50 years.

Historically, about 60 percent of the invasive species that entered the lakes came from shipping, as ballast water taken in to stabilize vessels was often collected at departure ports. Both the water and the marine life in it were released upon arrival at the destination.

Regulations in 2006 and 2008 that dictate ballast water be changed prior to entering the St. Lawrence Seaway and subsequently the Great Lakes seem to have be

tafbutton blue16 Killer Shrimp Could Be Next Great Lakes Invasive Species

” Could Hardly Have Been ” by Suzán Jiván Mom & Mom- Mom Suzán Could hardly have been award-winning tick tick…BOOM! peek-a-boo seen anew after playing the …

tafbutton blue16 Could Hardly Have Been

Researchers studying a species of shrimp that live near hydrothermal vents in the Caribbean are hoping to better understand the possibility of alien life.

Researchers studying a species of shrimp that live near hydrothermal vents in the Caribbean are hoping to better understand the possibility of alien life.

The hydrothermal vents are 75 hundred feet underwater, and the water temperatures can reach up to 750 degrees Fahrenheit.

Water an inch away from the vents is cool enough for the shrimp species to live in the extreme conditions.

Bacteria living inside of the vents produce carbohydrates that the blind shrimp feed on.

No sunlight reaches the hydrothermal vents, so the only energy that is provided comes from chemicals creating bacteria, which in turn provide sustenance for shrimp and other organisms deep in the ocean.

When there isn’t enough bacteria being produced, the shrimp survive by eating other crustaceans, including each other.

Experts are studying the shrimp because of their ability to live in extreme conditions means it could be possible for alien life to exist in places with similar environments.

A subsurface ocean exists on Jupiter’s moon Europa that experts think might be able to support alien life forms.

Emma Versteegh, a postdoctoral fellow at NASA’s Jet Propulsion laboratory is quoted as saying: “Whether an animal like this could exist on Europa heavily depends on the actual amount of energy that’s released there, through hydrothermal vents.”

tafbutton blue16 Extreme Shrimp Could Help Us Understand Alien Life

Holiness doesn’t not only deals with how we talk, dress, and act towards another, but also deals with how we eat. God told Noah about clean and unclean anima…

tafbutton blue16 The Bible NEVER Said You Could Eat Pork or Shrimp

Next week, the US publishes its influential Trafficking in Persons (TiP) report that ranks countries according to their efforts to tackle global slavery. Cou…

tafbutton blue16 What could the US TiP slavery report mean for Thailand?

Next week, the US publishes its influential Trafficking in Persons (TiP) report that ranks countries according to their efforts to tackle global slavery. Countries such as Thailand, in the…

tafbutton blue16 What could the US TiP slavery report mean for Thailand?

A study done by researchers at the University of Delaware and Stanford University found that wind turbines placed in the ocean could reduce the strength of hurricanes prior to the storms’ making landfall. The study showed that the turbines could help slow down winds, and decrease the size of waves, thus reducing storm surge.

tafbutton blue16 Offshore wind farms could weaken hurricanes, study says

Imagine you are enjoying a delightful shrimp dinner at a restaurant. You share with the restaurant staff just how much you are enjoying the meal, and they re…

tafbutton blue16 Research At NMSU Could Launch Shrimp Company

Residents of Emden, a town on the North Sea, can still remember the days when the unemployment rate here hovered around 14 percent. Today it’s just 6 percent. The seaport’s fortunes have risen thanks mainly to off-shore wind farming. But now the town is once again facing strong headwinds as two key businesses linked to the industry are in trouble.

One — the Nordseewerke — has been forced to declare bankruptcy. Made in Germany looks at the hopes and fears of the people of Emden.
Powered by NewsLook.com
Producer : Deutsche Welle

tafbutton blue16 Offshore Wind Farm Emdens Dream of Producing Green Energy Could Be Dashed

Researchers in Kansas are attempting to reverse what they consider to be a critical mistake our ancestors made some 10,000 years ago – the planting of annual crops instead of perennials. They want to replace standard wheat with wheatgrass. (Nov. 20)

Copyright 2013 The Associated Press

tafbutton blue16 Experimental Wheat Could Change Farming

Lack of a new farm bill is affecting York County farmers, but could also reach all the way into your wallet. 

tafbutton blue16 Milk prices could rise if farm bill not passed

Vertical farming in tall greenhouses keep crops closer to home, making it popular in major cities.

Have you ever wanted to grow a vegetable garden, but just didn’t have the space for all those plants? Vertical farming is the newest urban craze.

In cities where there is no room to have large plots of land for growing food, the only way to farm is to build up, and innovative urban communities are doing just that. It cuts down on transportation costs for produce and allows for the fruits and vegetables to be fresher than if they were grown thousands of miles away.

Other benefits to indoor farming include reducing the amounts of pesticides used to grow food, which end up polluting the environment.

Dickson Despommier, a professor of microbiology at Columbia University came up with the concept of vertical farming along with some of his students in 1999. He has written a book called Vertical Farming – Feeding the World in the 21st Century.

There are several projects underway to implement the vertical farming method, including one of the largest vertical farms ever being planned for construction in Sweden.

Would you grow your own vertical farm?

tafbutton blue16 Vertical Farming in Cities Could Be Big

This video Could organic farming solve the world’s food problems? is from the series Organic Farming

tafbutton blue16 Could organic farming solve the worlds food problems?: Organic Farming

Switch to our mobile site