[Farmed] Videos

Local landowner Johnny Noble and marine biologist Andy Lane started the Loch Fyne Oyster Farm in 1978. Since then, it’s become a global business.

tafbutton blue16 How oysters are farmed in Scotlands lochs

Local landowner Johnny Noble and marine biologist Andy Lane started the Loch Fyne Oyster Farm in 1978. Since then, it’s become a global business.

tafbutton blue16 How oysters are farmed in Scotlands lochs

Local landowner Johnny Noble and marine biologist Andy Lane started the Loch Fyne Oyster Farm in 1978. Since then, it’s become a global business.

tafbutton blue16 How oysters are farmed in Scotlands lochs

Who would have thought that the foothills of Tanjung Malim could be home to a sturgeon farm? But that is exactly what T’lur Caviar has done, minus the millions that it would have cost for climate control.

Sturgeons typically thrive in cold water but this farm has managed to acclimatise the fish to Malaysia’s warm weather, branding their product tropical caviar.

These little black roes fetch a pretty price in the market, as much as RM30,00 per kilogram!

tafbutton blue16 Caviar is farmed and processed in Tanjung Malim

Ninety-Five: Meeting America’s Farmed Animals in Stories and Photographs
By : No Voice Unheard

https://kimihime-download8.blogspot.com/?book=0972838759

tafbutton blue16 About For Books  Ninety Five: Meeting Americas Farmed Animals in Stories and Photographs by No

A team of researchers have produced Afghanistan’s first-ever batch of licensed scorpion venom and are preparing to export the product to the US. One scorpion produces, at the most, just two milligrammes of venom at a time. According to the farm’s head Darwesh Haji, the facility has managed to extract 300-400 grammes so far. Scorpion venom is highly prized on the international market, and is amongst the most expensive liquids in the world. The venom contains various toxins, which can be used in medical research for cancer and malaria treatments

tafbutton blue16 Scorpion venom farmed for profit in Afghanistan and headed for export

Captive tigers in China are being kept in appalling conditions in order to produce the aphrodisiac known as “tiger wine” for Chinese men, according to animal rights activists.

Captive tigers in China are being kept in appalling conditions in order to produce the aphrodisiac known as “tiger wine” for Chinese men, according to animal rights activists. 
It’s technically illegal in the country to breed the big cats in captivity, however, an exception allows tiger farms to do so if they are professedly in place to deter poaching, reports RT.
Animal rights activists say it’s all just smoke and mirrors–that the farms are intentionally starving the tigers to death for profit.

tafbutton blue16 Chinese Tigers Being Farmed In Horrific Conditions To Make Aphrodisiac Wine

Click Here http://www.ezbooks.site/?book=9400748833

[PDF] Bacterial Fish Pathogens: Disease of Farmed and Wild Fish Full Online

tafbutton blue16 [PDF] Bacterial Fish Pathogens: Disease of Farmed and Wild Fish Full Online

Switch to our mobile site